Herpes Virus Infection Increases The Risk of Diabetes Patient

Diabetic patients are susceptible to herpes virus infection due to decreased cell-mediated immunity (CMI) during this process and the reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is generally recognized as a prothrombotic disease associated with altered innate or adaptive immunity and endothelial dysfunction secondary to inflammation. Therefore, diabetes mellitus with chronic comorbidities or associated vascular complications is considered a major preventable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Diabetic patients are two to four times more likely to develop cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease than non-diabetic patients. Patients are at increased risk of developing the herpes virus if they have two or more comorbidities. On the other hand, herpes zoster was an independent risk factor for VZV vascular lesions such as stroke, transient ischemic attack, and myocardial infarction. However, few studies have examined the association between shingles risk and diabetes-related micro vascular disease in diabetic patients with coronary artery disease (CAD).